Southern Colorado Business Partnership
County Statistics

Regional Data

SCBP recognizes that it is vitally important to corporate relocation consultants and community partners that we have up-to-date, accurate information.  We work with our various regional partners to provide to you the most accurate and update information available.  If you have questions or would like to submit information for possible inclusion, please contact us.

Douglas County, Colorado

Douglas County is the eighth most populous of the 64 counties of the state of Colorado, in the United States. The county is located midway between Colorado's two largest cities: Denver and Colorado Springs. The United States Census Bureau that the county population was 285,465 in 2010 census, a 62.4% increase since the 2000 census, making Douglas County one of the fastest growing counties in the United States.  Douglas County is part of the Denver-Aurora Metropolitan Statistical Area and the Denver-Aurora-Boulder Combined Statistical Area. The county seat is Castle Rock, named after a prominent castle tower-shaped butte just north of the town.

Douglas County is lightly wooded, mostly with ponderosa pine, with broken terrain characterized by mesas and small streams. Cherry Creek and Plum Creek rise in Douglas County and flow north toward Denver and into the South Platte River. Both were subject to flash flooding in the past, Plum Creek being partially responsible for the Denver flood of 1965. Cherry Creek is now dammed.

Most residents commute to workplaces elsewhere in the metropolitan area outside of the county. Suburban development is displacing the ranching economy of the county.

Geography
According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 842.75 square miles, of which 840.11 (or 99.69%) is land and 2.64 square miles (or 0.31%) is water.

Cities and towns
  • Aurora (partially)
  • Castle Pines North
  • Castle Rock
  • Larkspur
  • Littleton (partially)
  • Lone Tree
  • Parker
Demographics
As of the census of 2000, there were 175,766 people, 60,924 households, and 49,835 families residing in the county. The population density was 209 people per square mile. There were 63,333 housing units at an average density of 75 per square mile. The racial makeup of the county was 92.77% White, 0.95% Black or African American, 0.41% Native American, 2.51% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 1.43% from other races, and 1.88% from two or more races. 5.06% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 60,924 households out of which 47.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 73.8% were married couples living together, 5.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.2% were non-families. 13.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 1.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.88 and the average family size was 3.19.

In the county the population was spread out with 31.6% under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 37.9% from 25 to 44, 21.6% from 45 to 64, and 4.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 99.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.4 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $82,929, and the median income for a family was $88,482 (these figures had risen to $93,819 and $102,767 respectively as of a 2007 estimate). Males had a median income of $60,729 versus $38,965 for females. The per capita income for the county was $34,848. About 1.6% of families and 2.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.9% of those under age 18 and 3.7% of those age 65 or over.

Douglas County had the highest median household income of any Colorado county or statistical equivalent in 2000. In 2008, it ranked #8 in the United States in that category - it was one of two in the top 15 not in the vicinity of New York or Washington.

Education
Douglas County is served by Douglas County School District RE-1, the third-largest school district in Colorado. In addition to traditional neighborhood schools, the district includes six charter schools, four option schools and an online school . Schools are rated generally high in the area.

The University Center at Chaparral in Parker offers courses through Arapahoe Community College, University of Colorado Denver, University College of the University of Denver, and the Douglas County School District. The University of Phoenix has a campus in Lone Tree.
 
Top employers
According to the County's 2010 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[10] the top employers in the county are:
# Employer # of Employees
1 Douglas County School District RE-1 6,245
2 EchoStar 1,840
3 CH2M HILL 1,600
4 tw telecom 1,100
5 Western Union 1,090
6 Douglas County 1,061
7 HealthONE: Sky Ridge Medical Center 1,030
8 Centura Health: Parker Adventist Hospitals 840
9 Liberty Media 730
10 IHS 700
 
External links

El Paso County, Colorado

El Paso County is the most populous of the 64 counties of the state of Colorado of the United States. The U.S. Census Bureau reported that the county population was 622,263 in 2010, greater than Denver County, which had previously been the most populous county.  The county seat of El Paso County is Colorado Springs, the second most populous city in Colorado. The Colorado Springs Metropolitan Statistical Area comprises El Paso County and Teller County.

In 2004, the voters of Colorado Springs and El Paso County established the Pikes Peak Rural Transportation Authority (PPRTA) and adopted a 1% sales tax dedicated to improving the region's transportation infrastructure. Together with state funding for COSMIX (2007 completion) and the I-25 interchange with Highway 16 (2008 completion), significant progress has been made since 2003 in addressing the transportation needs of the area.
 
Geography
According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 2,129.56 square miles, of which 2,126.45 square miles (or 99.85%) is land and 3.11 square miles (or 0.15%) is water.
 
Demographics
As of the census[ of 2000, there were 516,929 people, 192,409 households, and 133,916 families residing in the county. The population density was 243 people per square mile. There were 202,428 housing units at an average density of 95 per square mile. The racial makeup of the county was 81.19% White, 6.51% Black or African American, 0.91% Native American, 2.53% Asian, 0.24% Pacific Islander, 4.70% from other races, and 3.91% from two or more races. 11.30% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 192,409 households out of which 36.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.60% were married couples living together, 10.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.40% were non-families. 23.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.11.

In the county the population was spread out with 27.60% under the age of 18, 10.50% from 18 to 24, 32.50% from 25 to 44, 20.70% from 45 to 64, and 8.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 100.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.80 males.
 
Cities and towns
  • Calhan
  • Colorado Springs
  • Fountain
  • Green Mountain Falls
  • Manitou Springs
  • Monument
  • Palmer Lake
  • Ramah
Military sites
  • United States Air Force Academy
  • Cheyenne Mountain
  • North American Aerospace Defense Command
  • Peterson Air Force Base
  • Schriever Air Force Base
  • Fort Carson Army Base 
External links

Fremont County, Colorado

Fremont County is the 16th most populous of the 64 counties of the state of Colorado of the United States. The county is named for explorer and presidential candidate John C. Frémont. The county population was 46,824 at the 2010 census. The county seat is Cañon City. The Cañon City Micropolitan Statistical Area comprises Fremont County. Fremont County is also home to 15 prisons.

ADX Supermax, the only federal Supermax prison in the United States, is in an unincorporated area in Fremont County, south of Florence.
 
Geography
According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 1,533.95 square miles, of which 1,532.93 square miles (or 99.93%) is land and 1.02 square miles (or 0.07%) is water.

Demographics
As of the census[8] of 2000, there were 46,145 people, 15,232 households, and 10,494 families residing in the county. The population density was 30 people per square mile. There were 17,145 housing units at an average density of 11 per square mile (4/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 89.52% White, 5.34% Black or African American, 1.53% Native American, 0.50% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 1.22% from other races, and 1.82% from two or more races. 10.35% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 15,232 households out of which 30.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.30% were married couples living together, 9.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.10% were non-families. 26.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 2.93.

In the county the population was spread out with 20.60% under the age of 18, 7.50% from 18 to 24, 33.40% from 25 to 44, 24.00% from 45 to 64, and 14.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 133.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 143.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $34,150, and the median income for a family was $42,303. Males had a median income of $30,428 versus $23,112 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,420. About 8.30% of families and 11.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.80% of those under age 18 and 7.40% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns
  • Brookside
  • Cañon City
  • Coal Creek
  • Coaldale
  • Cotopaxi
  • Florence
  • Howard
  • Lincoln Park
  • Penrose
  • Prospect Heights
  • Rockvale
  • Williamsburg
External links

Pueblo County, Colorado

Pueblo County /ˈpwɛbloʊ/ is the tenth most populous of the 64 counties of the state of Colorado of the United States. The county was named for the historic city of Pueblo which took its name from the Spanish language word meaning "town" or "village". The United States Census Bureau that the county population was 159,063 in 2010 census, a 12.4% increase from 2000 census. The county seat is Pueblo. The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has designated Pueblo County as the Pueblo, CO Metropolitan Statistical Area.
 
Geography
According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 2,397.73 square miles, of which 2,388.69 square miles (or 99.62%) is land and 9.04 square miles (or 0.38%) is water.

Demographics
As of the Census 2007 statistical update, there were 154,712 people, 59,956 households, and 40,084 families residing in the county. The population density was 59 people per square mile. There were 67,314 housing units at an average density of 25 per square mile (10/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 79.47% Caucasian, 1.90% Black or African American, 1.59% Native American, 0.65% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 12.93% from other races, and 3.38% from two or more races. 37.97% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 11.6% were of German, 8.8% Italian, 6.7% English, 6.6% American and 6.5% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 59,956 households out of which 31.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.10% were married couples living together, 13.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.60% were non-families. 26.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older.

The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.04.
In the county the population was spread out with 25.80% under the age of 18, 9.40% from 18 to 24, 27.20% from 25 to 44, 22.40% from 45 to 64, and 15.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 95.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $41,283, and the median income for a family was $50,143. The per capita income for the county was $21,656. About 11.20% of families and 14.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.70% of those under age 18 and 8.70% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns
  • Avondale
  • Beulah Valley
  • Boone
  • Colorado City
  • Pueblo
  • Pueblo Springs Ranch
  • Pueblo West
  • Rye
  • Salt Creek
  • Vineland 
External links

Otero County, Colorado

Otero County is one of the 64 counties of the State of Colorado of the United States. The county was named for Miguel Antonio Otero, one of the founders of the town of La Junta and a member of a prominent Hispanic family. The county population was 20,311 at U.S. Census 2000. The county seat is La Junta.
 
Geography
According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 1,269.74 square miles, of which 1,262.86 square miles (or 99.46%) is land and 6.89 square miles (or 0.54%) is water.
 
Demographics
As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 20,311 people, 7,920 households, and 5,472 families residing in the county. The population density was 16 people per square mile. There were 8,813 housing units at an average density of 7 per square mile (3/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 79.02% White, 0.76% Black or African American, 1.43% Native American, 0.70% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 15.06% from other races, and 2.96% from two or more races. 37.62% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 7,920 households out of which 32.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.70% were married couples living together, 12.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.90% were non-families. 27.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the county the population was spread out with 26.90% under the age of 18, 8.90% from 18 to 24, 24.40% from 25 to 44, 23.40% from 45 to 64, and 16.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 95.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,738, and the median income for a family was $35,906. Males had a median income of $26,996 versus $21,001 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,113. About 14.20% of families and 18.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.90% of those under age 18 and 11.80% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns
  • Cheraw
  • Fowler
  • La Junta
  • Manzanola
  • Rocky Ford
  • Swink 

External links

Prowers County, Colorado

Prowers County is one of the 64 counties of the State of Colorado of the United States. The county is named in honor of John W. Prowers, a leading pioneer in the lower Arkansas valley region. The county population was 14,483 at U.S. Census 2000.  The county seat is Lamar.
 
Geography
According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 1,644.35 square miles, of which 1,640.38 square miles (or 99.76%) is land and 3.97 square miles (or 0.24%) is water.
 
Demographics
As of the census of 2000, there were 14,483 people, 5,307 households, and 3,725 families residing in the county. The population density was 9 people per square mile (3/km²). There were 5,977 housing units at an average density of 4 per square mile (1/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 78.57% White, 0.30% Black or African American, 1.22% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 17.17% from other races, and 2.34% from two or more races. 32.91% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 5,307 households out of which 37.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.60% were married couples living together, 10.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.80% were non-families. 25.40% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.21.

In the county the population was spread out with 30.00% under the age of 18, 10.70% from 18 to 24, 26.50% from 25 to 44, 20.20% from 45 to 64, and 12.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 101.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,935, and the median income for a family was $34,202. Males had a median income of $24,971 versus $20,526 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,150. About 14.50% of families and 19.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.10% of those under age 18 and 13.90% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns
  • Granada
  • Hartman
  • Holly
  • Lamar
  • Wiley
  • Bristol 
External links

Las Animas County, Colorado

Las Animas County has the largest area of the 64 counties of the State of Colorado of the United States. Las Animas County takes its name from the Mexican Spanish name of the Purgatoire River, originally called El Río de las Ánimas Perdidas en Purgatorio, which means "River of the Lost Souls in Purgatory." The county's population was 15,507 at the 2010 census, an increase from 15,207 in 2000. The county seat is Trinidad.

Geography
According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 4,775.42 square miles, of which 4,772.63 square miles (or 99.94%) is land and 2.79 square miles (or 0.06%) is water.

Demographics
As of the census of 2000, there were 15,207 people, 6,173 households, and 4,092 families residing in the county. The population density was 3 people per square mile (1/km²). There were 7,629 housing units at an average density of 2 per square mile (1/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 82.63% White, 0.39% Black or African American, 2.54% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 0.20% Pacific Islander, 10.03% from other races, and 3.83% from two or more races. 41.45% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 6,173 households out of which 28.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.90% were married couples living together, 11.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.70% were non-families. 29.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 2.97.

In the county the population was spread out with 24.20% under the age of 18, 7.90% from 18 to 24, 24.00% from 25 to 44, 25.90% from 45 to 64, and 18.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 95.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $28,273, and the median income for a family was $34,072. Males had a median income of $27,182 versus $20,891 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,829. About 14.00% of families and 17.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.00% of those under age 18 and 17.20% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns
  • Aguilar
  • Boncarbo
  • Branson
  • Cokedale
  • Delhi
  • Hoehne
  • Jansen
  • Kim
  • Ludlow
  • Madrid
  • Model
  • Segundo
  • Sopris
  • Starkville
  • Thatcher
  • Trinchera
  • Trinidad
  • Tyrone
  • Villegreen
  • Weston 
External links