Southern Colorado Business Partnership
Key Communities

Cañon City, Colorado

Geography and climate
According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 12.0 square miles, of which 12.0 square miles is land and 0.08% is water. Cañon City sits in the "high desert" land of southern Colorado, the same desert lands of Pueblo and Florence.

The city's nickname, "the Climate Capital of Colorado", derives from the combination of unique geography and 5,300 ft elevation protecting the city from harsh weather conditions. The average daily high temperature in January is 14 degrees warmer in Cañon City than in Grand Junction  even though the elevation of Cañon City is higher.

Overnight low temperatures are also considerably warmer in Cañon City than in Denver. The average minimum temperature in January is 20 degrees. During July, overnight lows are 59 degrees on average. Cañon City has a semi-arid climate.

Demographics
As of the census of 2000, there were 15,431 people, 6,164 households, and 3,803 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,284.1 people per square mile (495.7/km²). There were 6,617 housing units at an average density of 550.6 per square mile (212.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 93.15% White, 1.59% African American, 1.04% Native American, 0.54% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 1.61% from other races, and 2.01% from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 8.33% of the population.

There were 6,164 households out of which 28.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.0% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.3% were non-families. 33.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.90.

The age distribution was 23.5% under the age of 18, 6.7% from 18 to 24, 28.2% from 25 to 44, 21.5% from 45 to 64, and 20.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 100.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $31,736, and the median income for a family was $42,917. Males had a median income of $31,258 versus $21,849 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,970. About 7.1% of families and 11.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.9% of those under age 18 and 9.6% of those age 65 or over.

Economy
The area being situated along the Arkansas River has allowed for soil suitable to orchards, ranching and farming, but Cañon City has slowly transitioned from an agricultural community to more of a diverse economy. The major employers in Cañon City include the Colorado Department of Corrections and Centura Health, who owns St. Thomas More Hospital and the Progressive Care Center.

External links

Castle Rock, Colorado

The Town of Castle Rock is the county seat of Douglas County, Colorado, United States and is named after the prominent castle tower-shaped butte near the center of town. It is part of Colorado's Front Range Urban Corridor and is located roughly 10 miles south of Denver and 37 mi north of Colorado Springs.As of the 2010 census, the town had a population of 48,231.
 
Geography
The town of Castle Rock is named after this prominent castle tower-shaped butte.

Castle Rock is located at an elevation of 6,224 feet. The town lies in the Colorado Piedmont on the western edge of the Great Plains. The Front Range of the Rocky Mountains lay a few miles to the west. East Plum Creek, a stream within the South Platte River drainage basin, runs north then northwest through Castle Rock.

Common landforms in Castle Rock consist of rock outcroppings, steep hillsides, cliffs, canyons, mesas, and plateaus. About 37 million years ago, a volcanic eruption took place that covered the area around Castle Rock with 20 feet (6.1 m) of extremely resistant rock called rhyolite. After a few million years, mass flooding and erosion of the volcanic rock gave way to the castle-shaped butte that is the town's namesake. The butte sits near the town's center, immediately north of downtown. Other prominent landforms visible from Castle Rock include Dawson Butte, Devils Head, Mount Evans and Pikes Peak.

Castle Rock is within the Colorado Foothills Life Zone. The hillsides are covered with large meadows of grass, small plants, scattered juniper trees and open Ponderosa Pine woodlands. Other trees common in the area include Gambel Oak (Scrub Oak or Oak Brush), Pinyon, and Pinyon Pine. Local wildlife includes the American Badger, American Black Bear, Bobcat, Coyote, Colorado Chipmunk, Gray Fox, Mountain Cottontail Rabbit, Mountain Lion, Mule Deer, Pocket Gopher, Porcupine, and Skunk. Birds that can be found in the area include the Golden Eagle, Peregrine Falcon, Sharp-shinned Hawk, Black-billed Magpie, Red-tailed Hawk, Pinyon Jay and Western Tanager.

Castle Rock is located in central Colorado on Interstate 25 roughly 28 mi  south of Denver and 37 mi north of Colorado Springs.[6] Lying within the Front Range Urban Corridor, the town is part of the greater Denver metropolitan area. Nearby communities include Castle Pines North, Lone Tree, Parker, Highlands Ranch, Larkspur, Franktown and Sedalia. According to the United States Census Bureau, Castle Rock has a total area of 31.6 square miles.
 
Climate
Castle Rock experiences a semi-arid climate (Köppen BSk) with cold, dry, snowy winters and hot, wetter summers. On average, the town receives 17.3 inches (440 mm) of precipitation annually. Snowfall averages 60 inches (150 cm) per year. On average, January is the coldest month, July is the hottest month, and May is the wettest month. The hottest temperature recorded in Castle Rock was 99 °F (37 °C) in July 1973; the coldest temperature recorded was −35 °F (−37 °C) in January 1963.
 
Demographics
As of the 2010 census, there were 48,231 people, 16,688 households, and 12,974 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,526.3 people per square mile. There were 17,626 housing units at an average density of 557.8 per square mile. The racial makeup of the town was 90.7% White, 1.1% Black or African American, 0.6% Native American, 1.7% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 2.9% from other races, and 2.8% from two or more races. 10.0% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 16,688 households out of which 48.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.4% were married couples living together, 3.9% had a male householder with no wife present, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.3% were non-families. 17.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.86, and the average family size was 3.27.

In the town, the population was spread out with 32.4% under the age of 18, 5.8% from 18 to 24, 33.0% from 25 to 44, 22.6% from 45 to 64, and 6.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33.8 years. For every 100 females, there were 98.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.5 males age 18 and over.

As of 2009, the median income for a household in the town was $86,777, and the median income for a family was $97,599. Males had a median income of $65,996 versus $46,151 for females. The per capita income for the town was $34,664. About 3.6% of families and 6.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.7% of those under age 18 and 3.6% of those age 65 or over.

Castle Rock is the 17th most populous municipality in Colorado and is the center of the burgeoning urbanization of the county.

Economy
Many of Castle Rock’s residents work in the Denver Technological Center, better known as "The Denver Tech Center" (DTC), which is a 15 minute drive north on I-25. Downtown Denver and Denver International Airport are both approximately a 40 minute drive from Castle Rock.

Education
Douglas County School District provides public primary and secondary education with fourteen schools in Castle Rock.

Health Care
Castle Rock residents have access to numerous options when it comes to quality health care. Within town there are several medical offices, an urgent care and an emergency room. Castle Rock Adventist Hospital, a full service hospital opens August 1, 2013. The 50 bed hospital will offer comprehensive health care to the growing southern Douglas County area. Labor and delivery suites, NICU, orthopedic surgery, ICU and medical imaging make it convenient for Castle Rock residents to receive quality medical care close to home.
 
External links

Colorado Springs, Colorado

Colorado Springs is a Home Rule Municipality that is the county seat and most populous city of El Paso County, Colorado, United States. Colorado Springs is located in the center portion of the state. It is situated on Fountain Creek and is located 65 miles south of the Colorado State Capitol in Denver. At 6,035 feet the city stands over one mile above sea level, though some areas of the city are significantly higher and lower. Colorado Springs is situated near the base of one of the most famous American mountains, Pikes Peak, in the eastern edge of the Southern Rocky Mountains. The city is often referred to as "The Springs."

With a population of 416,427 as of the 2010 Census] it is the second most populous city in the state of Colorado, behind Denver, and the 41st most populous city in the United States, while the Colorado Springs Metropolitan Statistical Area had an estimated population of 645,613 in 2010.  The city covers 194.7 square miles, making it Colorado's largest city in area. Colorado Springs was selected as the No. 1 Best Big City in "Best Places to Live" by Money magazine in 2006, and placed number one in Outside's 2009 list of America's Best Cities.

Geography
The city is made up of the mountains to the west, the Palmer Divide to the north, high plains further east, and desert land to the south when leaving Fountain and approaching Pueblo.
According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 186.1 sq mi, of which 185.8 sq mi is land and 0.39 sq mi (0.21%) is water.

Climate
Colorado Springs has a semi-arid climate (Köppen BSk), and its location just east of the Southern Rocky Mountains affords it the rapid warming influence from chinook winds during winter but also subjects it to drastic day-to-day variability in weather conditions.[11] The city has abundant sunshine throughout the year, averaging over 300 days of sun per year, and receives approximately 16.5 inches (419 mm) of annual precipitation. Due to unusually low precipitation for several years after flooding in 1999, Colorado Springs enacted lawn water restrictions in 2002. These were lifted in 2005.

Colorado Springs is also one of the most active lightning strike areas in the United States. This natural phenomenon led Nikola Tesla to select Colorado Springs as the preferred location to build his lab and study electricity.[citation needed]

Demographics
As of the 2010 census, the population of Colorado Springs was 416,427 (47th most populous U.S. city), and the population of the Colorado Springs Metropolitan Statistical Area was 645,613 in 2010 (84th most populous MSA),and the population of the Front Range Urban Corridor in Colorado was an estimated 4,166,855.

As of the April 2010 census: 78.8% White, 16.1% Hispanic or Latino (of any race), 6.3% Black or African American, 3.0% Asian, 1.0% Native American, 0.3% Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, 5.5% Some other race, 5.1% Two or more races. Mexican Americans made up 14.6% of the city's population.

Economy
Colorado Springs' economy is driven primarily by the military, the high-tech industry, and tourism, in that order. The city is currently experiencing some growth mainly in the service sectors. The current unemployment rate, as of June 2012, in Colorado Springs is 9.8%  compared to 8.2% for the State  and the Nation.
           
            Defense industry
            The defense industry plays a major role in the Colorado Springs economy, with some of the city's largest employers coming from the sector.  A large segment of this industry is dedicated to the development and operation of various projects for missile defense. With its close ties to defense, the aerospace industry has also influenced the Colorado Springs economy.  Although some defense corporations have left or downsized in the city include Boeing, General Dynamics, Harris Corporation, SAIC, ITT, L-3  Communications, Lockheed Martin, and Northrop Grumman.      
 
            High-tech industry
            A large percentage of Colorado Springs' economy is still based on manufacturing high tech and complex electronic equipment. The high tech sector in the Colorado Springs area has decreased its overall presence from 2000 to 2006 (from around 21,000 down to around 8,000), with notable reductions in information technology and complex electronic equipment. Due to a slowing in tourism, the high tech sector still remains second to the military in terms of total revenue generated and employment.  Current trends project the high tech employment ratio will continue to decrease in the near future.

            High tech corporations with connections to the city include:
  •             Verizon Business, a telecommunications firm, had nearly 1300 employees  in 2008.
  •             Hewlett-Packard is a large sales, support, and SAN storage engineering center for the computer industry. 
  •             Agilent, spun off from HP in 1999 as an independent,  traded company.
  •             LSI Corporation designs semiconductors and software that accelerate storage and networking in data centers and mobile networks.
  •             Atmel (formerly Honeywell), is a chip fabrication organization.
  •             Cypress Semiconductor Colorado Design Center is a chip fabrication research and development.
Top employers
According to the City's 2011 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, the top employers in the city are:
# Employer Percentage of County Employment
1 Fort Carson 10.20%
2 Peterson Air Force Base 4.11%
3 Schriever Air Force Base 2.86%
4 United States Air Force Academy 2.29%
5 Memorial Health Services 1.65%
6 Colorado Springs School District 11 1.40%
7 Academy School District 20 0.97%
8 Penrose-St. Francis Health Services 0.93%
9 City of Colorado Springs 0.81%
10 El Paso County 0.70%
 
Military Installations
The United States Military plays a very important role in the city. Colorado Springs is home to both Army and Air Force bases. These military installations border the city, to the north, south and east, aside from Schriever Air Force Base, which is located farther east of the city, still in El Paso County.
 
            Fort Carson
            Fort Carson is the city's largest military base, and until mid-2006 was home to the 3d Armored Cavalry Regiment, which relocated to Fort Hood, Texas. In 2009, Fort Carson became the home station of the 4th Infantry Division, which nearly doubled the base's population.  Fort Carson is host to various training grounds for infantry, armor, and aviation units. Fort Carson is also the headquarters of the second and third battalions of the 10th Special Forces Group.
 
            Peterson Air Force Base
            The Air Force has critical aspects of their service based at Colorado Springs which carry on missile defense operations and development. The Air Force bases a large section of the national missile defense operations here, with Peterson Air Force Base set to operate large sections of the program. Peterson AFB is currently the headquarters of the majority of Air Force Space Command and the operations half of Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Strategic Command (SMDC/ARSTRAT).

            Peterson is also headquarters for the United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM), one of the Unified Combatant Commands. USNORTHCOM directs all branches of the U.S. military operations in their area of responsibility which includes the continental United States, Alaska, Canada, and Mexico. In the event of national emergencies the President or Secretary of Defense can call upon USNORTHCOM for any required military assistance. Service members from every branch of the US Military are stationed at the command.
 
            Schriever Air Force Base (formerly Falcon AFB)
            Schriever Air Force Base is home to the 50th Space Wing, which controls warning, navigational, communications and spy satellites. It is also the home of the Space Warfare Center and the home for the 576th Flight Test Squadron. It is the location of the Global Positioning System (GPS) master control station and GPS Operations Center and the US Naval Observatory Alternate Master Clock, used to synchronize GPS satellite time. Schriever is also developing parts of national missile defense and runs parts of the annual wargames used by the nation's military.
 
            United States Air Force Academy
            Just north of the city lie the vast grounds of the United States Air Force Academy, where cadets train to become officers in the Air Force. The campus is famous for its unique chapel and draws visitors year round. Most of the Air Force Academy's sports programs belong to the Mountain West Conference.

            NORAD and Cheyenne Mountain Air Station
            The North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), a component of America's missile defense system, is located in Cheyenne Mountain Air Station. When it was built at the height of the Cold War, NORAD caused some anxiety for the residents in and around Colorado Springs, who believed the installation would be a primary target during a nuclear attack. Although NORAD still operates today, it is primarily tasked with the tracking of ICBMs, and the military has recently decided to place Cheyenne Mountain's NORAD/NORTHCOM operations on warm standby and move operations to nearby Peterson Air Force Base.

Tourism
The city's location at the base of Pikes Peak and the Rocky Mountains makes it a popular tourism destination. Tourism is the third largest employer in the Pikes Peak region, accounting for more than 13,000 jobs. Nearly 5 million visitors come to the area annually, contributing $1.35 billion in revenue.

Colorado Springs has more than 55 attractions and activities in the area,[46] including Garden of the Gods, United States Air Force Academy, Cheyenne Mountain Zoo, Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Old Colorado City and the U.S. Olympic Training Center.

The downtown Colorado Springs Visitor Information Center offers free area information to leisure and business travelers. The Cultural Office of the Pikes Peak Region (COPPeR), also located downtown, supports and advocates for the arts throughout the Pikes Peak Region. It operates the PeakRadar website to communicate city events.

Olympic sports
Colorado Springs is home to the United States Olympic Training Center and the headquarters of the United States Olympic Committee. In addition, a number of United States national federations for individual Olympic sports have their headquarters in Colorado Springs, including: United States or USA bobsled, fencing, skating, basketball, boxing, cycling, judo, field hockey, hockey, swimming, shooting, table tennis, triathlon, volleyball, and wrestling associations and organizations.[citation needed]

The city has a particularly long association with the sport of figure skating, having hosted the U.S. Figure Skating Championships 6 times and the World Figure Skating Championships 5 times. It is home to the World Figure Skating Museum and Hall of Fame and the Broadmoor Skating Club, a notable training center for the sport. In recent years, the World Arena has hosted skating events such as Skate America and the Four Continents Figure Skating Championships.
 
Higher Education
Bachelors and graduate degree programs are offered at Colorado College, CollegeAmerica, University of Colorado Colorado Springs (UCCS), Colorado Technical University, Remington College,[70] Nazarene Bible College, Colorado State University–Pueblo Citadel Campus, DeVry University, and University of the Rockies.

The United States Air Force Academy is a military school for officer candidates.

IntelliTec College is a technical training school and Pikes Peak Community College offers a two year degree program.
 
External links

Falcon, Colorado

Falcon is an unincorporated exurb in El Paso County, Colorado, United States. It lies along US 24 about 14 miles northeast of Colorado Springs. A railroad hub in the early 20th century, the town spent several decades as a quiet ranching community until it experienced rapid residential growth throughout the 1990s. The population of Falcon as of 2009 is estimated to be 10,514. The U.S. Post Office at Peyton (ZIP Code 80831) now serves Falcon postal addresses.

Geography
Falcon neighborhoods include The Meadows, Elkhorn Estates, Meridian Ranch, Woodmen Hills, Falcon Hills, Paint Brush Hills and Falcon Heights.

Arts and culture
The Black Squirrel Creek Bridge, a property listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is located between Falcon and Peyton, Colorado.

On October 16, 2010, High Prairie Library, a branch of the Pikes Peak Library District opened to the public.

In 2004, the Antler Creek Golf Course opened as the longest golf course in Colorado and the second-longest in the nation.

Education
Students are served by Falcon School District 49. The district currently has three high schools, Falcon High School, Vista Ridge High School, and Sand Creek High School. The area's rapid growth has caused the district to grow by 1100 new students annually over the past few years. Pikes Peak Community College now has a campus in Falcon.
 
External links

Fountain, Colorado

The city of Fountain is a Home Rule Municipality located in El Paso County, Colorado, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city's population was 25,846.
Fountain is located 10 miles south of Colorado Springs and just east of Fort Carson. Fountain and the Colorado Springs suburbs Security and Widefield make up the "Fountain Valley" community.

Geography
According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 24.0 square miles, of which 24.0 square miles is land and 0.04 square miles, or 0.15%, is water. The eponymous Fountain Creek flows south through the city.

Demographics
As of the census of 2000, there were 15,197 people, 5,039 households, and 4,061 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,085.7 people per square mile. There were 5,219 housing units at an average density of 372.9 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 75.07% White, 8.74% African American, 1.41% Native American, 2.01% Asian, 0.55% Pacific Islander, 6.71% from other races, and 5.50% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 15.06% of the population.

There were 5,039 households out of which 49.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.7% were married couples living together, 13.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.4% were non-families. 14.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.01 and the average family size was 3.33.

In the city the population was spread out with 34.5% under the age of 18, 8.8% from 18 to 24, 34.3% from 25 to 44, 17.0% from 45 to 64, and 5.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 29 years. For every 100 females there were 98.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $42,121, and the median income for a family was $44,735. Males had a median income of $31,192 versus $24,000 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,975. About 5.9% of families and 8.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.6% of those under age 18 and 14.7% of those age 65 or over.

External links

La Junta, Colorado

Geography and Climate
According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.8 square miles, all of it land. The area is high plains terrain, dry with short grass prairie and sagebrush, and is part of the Southwestern Tablelands ecological region.

Demographics
There were 7,568 people, 2,977 households, and 1,964 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,652.0 people per square mile. There were 3,277 housing units at an average density of 1,148.3 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 74.22% White, 1.22% African American, 1.77% Native American, 0.86% Asian, 0.13% Pacific Islander, 18.33% from other races, and 3.48% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 43.60% of the population.

There were 2,977 households out of which 33.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.0% were married couples living together, 14.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.0% were non-families. 30.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the city the population was spread out with 27.1% under the age of 18, 10.4% from 18 to 24, 24.6% from 25 to 44, 21.4% from 45 to 64, and 16.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 89.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $29,002, and the median income for a family was $36,398. Males had a median income of $26,325 versus $21,324 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,928. About 16.8% of families and 21.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 31.4% of those under age 18 and 10.0% of those age 65 or over.
 
External links

Lamar, Colorado

Lamar is a Home Rule Municipality and county seat of Prowers County, Colorado, United States.[6] The city population was 8,869 at the U.S. Census 2000.
 
Geography and Climate
According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.2 square miles, all of it land. Lamar is east of Pueblo, on the Arkansas River in southeastern Colorado.

Demographics
As of the census of 2000, there were 8,869 people, 3,324 households, and 2,247 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,095.8 people per square mile. There were 3,656 housing units at an average density of 863.9/sq mi. The racial makeup of the city was 76.24% White, 0.38% African American, 1.48% Native American, 0.47% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 18.81% from other races, and 2.57% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 36.54% of the population.

There were 3,324 households out of which 36.0% had children living with them, 49.2% were married couples living together, 13.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.4% were non-families. 28.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.18.

In the city the population was spread out with 29.1% under the age of 18, 12.1% from 18 to 24, 26.1% from 25 to 44, 19.5% from 45 to 64, and 13.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 98.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $28,660, and the median income for a family was $32,560. Males had a median income of $24,145 versus $20,133 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,900. About 14.4% of families and 19.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 29.5% of those under age 18 and 12.2% of those age 65 or over.

Education
Lamar is part of School District RE-2.
Lamar is also home to Lamar Community College.
 
External links

Manitou Springs, Colorado

The city of Manitou Springs is a Home Rule Municipality located in El Paso County, Colorado, United States. The town was founded for its scenic setting and natural mineral springs. The downtown area continues to be of interest to travelers, particularly in the summer, as the downtown area consists of many one-story, adjoining, small shops, restaurants, and pubs, as well as a creekside city park with a children's playground made from unusual materials. Among other services, shops cater to tourist interests such as clothing, candy, souvenirs, and outdoor recreation. The main road through the center of town was one of the direct paths to the base of Pikes Peak. Barr Trail, which winds its way up Pikes Peak, is easily accessible from town.

The population was 4,992 Manitounians at the 2010 census. Students are served by Manitou Springs School District 14 and Manitou Springs High School.
 
Demographics
As of the census of 2000, there were 4,980 people, 2,452 households, and 1,255 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,642.6 people per square mile. There were 2,654 housing units at an average density of 875.4 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 93.98% White, 0.50% African American, 1.06% Native American, 1.12% Asian, 0.12% Pacific Islander, 0.94% from other races, and 2.27% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.65% of the population.

There were 2,452 households out of which 22.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.2% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 48.8% were non-families. 38.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.03 and the average family size was 2.73.

In the city the population was spread out with 18.6% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 31.6% from 25 to 44, 32.2% from 45 to 64, and 10.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 94.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $40,514, and the median income for a family was $57,260. Males had a median income of $39,102 versus $24,286 for females. The per capita income for the city was $24,492. About 4.7% of families and 7.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.3% of those under age 18 and 10.1% of those age 65 or over.

Attractions and Community Events

Attractions include:
  • Cave of the Winds, cave complex; tours given daily
  • Iron Springs Chateau and melodrama, located on Ruxton Avenue, is a dinner theatre for families and adults.[32][33]
  • Manitou Cliff Dwellings,[34] a full-size replica of Anasazi Indian cliff dwellings, as well as a museum. The cliff dwellings were relocated in the early 1900s from their original location in the Four Corners area.[35][36]
  • Manitou and Pike's Peak Railway, extending from Manitou Springs to the top of Pikes Peak[37]
  • Manitou Springs Food Tour[38]
  • Manitou Springs Heritage Center[39]
  • Miramont Castle and Manitou Springs Fire Department Museum
  • The Manitou Incline, a popular extreme hiking trail rising above town at the base of Mount Manitou 
Mineral Springs and Parks:
  • The Springsabouts Walking Tours, a tour of nine of the Manitou Mineral Springs sites offered by the Mineral Springs Foundation. People can also take their own tour of the springs by visiting The Manitou Springs Chamber of Commerce & Visitors Bureau to pick up a free mineral springs brochure, content chart and a sampling cup.[40]
  • Parks, from east to west along Manitou Avenue, include Schryver Park, Memorial Park, Mansions Park, and Soda Springs Park. Fields Community Park is located on El Paso Boulevard. Seven Minute Gazebo is located behind Mansions and Memorial Parks.[41][42]
  • Manitou Incline, a former incline railway bed that rises over 2,000 feet above Manitou Springs is a popular hiking and fitness activity. 
External links

Monument, Colorado

Monument is a rapidly growing town situated at the base of the Rampart Range in El Paso County, Colorado, United States. Monument is bordered by Pike National Forest on the west, Colorado Springs and the United States Air Force Academy to the south, foothills and rock outcroppings to the north, and rolling plains to the east. Monument was first settled as a stop along the Rio Grande Railroad in 1872, and the area was incorporated as a town called Henry's Station in 1879, but the name was later changed to Monument. The town population was 5,530 at the 2010 census, up from 1,971 in 2000. Monument is mainly home to small business, and has no manufacturing or big business.

Demographics
As of the census of 2000, there were 1,971 people, 725 households, and 550 families residing in the town. The population density was 426.1 people per square mile. There were 770 housing units at an average density of 166.4 per square mile. The racial makeup of the town was 91.98% White, 0.91% African American, 1.42% Native American, 0.96% Asian, 2.03% from other races, and 2.69% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.71% of the population.

There were 725 households out of which 45.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.2% were married couples living together, 11.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.1% were non-families. 19.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.12.

In the town the population was spread out with 32.9% under the age of 18, 6.8% from 18 to 24, 38.3% from 25 to 44, 17.7% from 45 to 64, and 4.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 97.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.0 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $50,000, and the median income for a family was $54,211. Males had a median income of $41,071 versus $27,583 for females. The per capita income for the town was $19,878. About 5.4% of families and 5.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.4% of those under age 18 and 7.4% of those age 65 or over.

Education
By Colorado law, Monument is a school-choice community. Because of this, there are opportunities for public schools,[14] private schools,[15] charter schools,[16] and home schooling groups.[17] The public school system is Lewis-Palmer School District 38. The Lewis-Palmer District ACT scores (at 23) are about 20% higher than the average state scores (at 19) in the two high schools (Palmer Ridge and Lewis-Palmer High Schools).[18] The Lewis-Palmer district as a whole performs 15-20% better on CSAP tests than the Colorado state average.[19]
 
Commerce
Monument's commerce is made up mostly of small businesses, not larger scale manufacturers. Individually owned shops and services located in the downtown's Monument Plaza offer a unique blend of quality shopping, all within walking distance of one another. Located off Highway 105 shoppers will find galleries, home décor, book and specialty stores, as well as restaurants and professional service businesses.[20] Jackson Creek Center, a more recent commercial expansion of the Monument stores that are located west of I-25, offers national "big box" chain store shopping (i.e., Walmart, Home Depot, etc.) mixed with smaller retail and service businesses, as well as office condominiums and restaurants.

External links

Pueblo, Colorado

Pueblo /ˈpwɛbloʊ/ is a Home Rule Municipality that is the county seat and the most populous city of Pueblo County, Colorado, United States. The population was 106,595 in 2010 census, making it the 246th most populous city in the United States.

Pueblo is situated at the confluence of the Arkansas River and Fountain Creek 112 miles south of the Colorado State Capitol in Denver, and 43 miles south of Colorado Springs. The area is considered to be semi-arid desert land, with approximately 12 inches of precipitation annually. With its location in the "banana belt", Pueblo tends to get less snow than the other major cities in Colorado. Pueblo is the heart of the Pueblo Metropolitan Statistical Area and an important part of the Front Range Urban Corridor.  Pueblo is one of the largest steel-producing cities in the United States;because of this Pueblo is referred to as the "Steel City". The Historic Arkansas River Project (HARP) is a river walk in the Union Avenue Historic Commercial District, and shows the history of the Pueblo Flood.

Pueblo has the least expensive residential real estate of any city in Colorado. The median home price for homes currently on the market in Pueblo is $147,851.
 
Education
Pueblo is home to Colorado State University-Pueblo (CSU-Pueblo), a regional comprehensive university. It is part of the Colorado State University System (CSU System), with about 6,000 students. On May 8, 2007, CSU-Pueblo got approval from the Board of Governors of the Colorado State University System to bring back football as a member of the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference. The first game was played in the fall of 2008 at the Thunderbowl, a new stadium at CSU-Pueblo which holds over 12,000 people.

Pueblo Community College (PCC) is a two-year, public, comprehensive community college, one of thirteen community colleges within the Colorado Community College System (CCCS). It operates three campuses serving a widely dispersed eight-county region in Southern Colorado. The main campus is located in Pueblo and serves Pueblo County. The Fremont Campus is located approximately 35 miles (56 km) west of Pueblo in Cañon City and serves Fremont and Custer Counties. The Southwest Campus, 280 miles (450 km) southwest of Pueblo, serves Montezuma, Dolores, La Plata, San Juan, and Archuleta counties. PCC is a Hispanic Serving Institution as designated by the Federal Government. Approximately 5,000 students attend PCC per semester.

Economy
Pueblo is the home of the Federal Citizen Information Center, operated by the General Services Administration, and its Consumer Information Catalog. For over 30 years, public service announcements invited Americans to write for information at "Pueblo, Colorado, 81009" (though the official address is Post Office Box 100). In recent times GSA has incorporated Pueblo into FCIC's toll-free telephone number (1-888-8 PUEBLO) and web address (www.pueblo.gsa.gov).

Vestas built the largest (nearly 700,000 square feet) wind turbine tower manufacturing plant in the world at Pueblo's industrial park. A number of scientific studies now list Pueblo as the state's best place for solar energy and a good place for solar companies to locate.[25]

Small Smiles Dental Centers originated from a dental clinic established in Pueblo in 1928. Small Smiles had its headquarters in Pueblo until they moved to Nashville, Tennessee in 2006.[26]

Top employers
According to Pueblo's 2011 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[27] the top employers in the city are:
# Employer # of Employees
1 Pueblo City Schools 2,478
2 Parkview Medical Center 2,352
3 Walmart 1,265
4 Pueblo County 1,150
5 Pueblo County School District 70 1,100
6 St. Mary-Corwin Medical Center 1,058
7 Evraz 1,035
8 Colorado Mental Health Institute at Pueblo 1,000
9 Convergys 685
10 City of Pueblo 647

Demographics
As of the census of 2000, there were 102,121 people, 40,307 households, and 26,118 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,265.5 people per square mile. There were 43,121 housing units at an average density of 956.6 per square mile (369.3/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 76.21% White, 2.41% African American, 1.73% Native American, 0.67% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 15.20% from other races, and 3.71% from two or more races. Latinos made up 44.13% of the population. 10.1% were of German, 8.1% Italian, 6.0% American, 5.5% English and 5.4% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000.

According to the 2005 Census estimates, the city had grown to an estimated population of 104,951 and had become the ninth most populous city in the state of Colorado and the 245th most populous city in the United States.

There were 40,307 households out of which 29.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.5% were married couples living together, 15.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.2% were non-families. 30.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 3.03.

In the city the population was spread out with 25.1% under the age of 18, 10.3% from 18 to 24, 26.6% from 25 to 44, 21.4% from 45 to 64, and 16.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 93.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $29,650, and the median income for a family was $35,620. Males had a median income of $29,702 versus $22,197 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,026. About 13.9% of families and 17.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.3% of those under age 18 and 9.1% of those age 65 or over.
 
Aviation
The local airport, Pueblo Memorial Airport, lies to the east of the city. It is home to the Pueblo Weisbrod Aircraft Museum (named for Fred Weisbrod, late city manager), reflecting the airport's beginnings as an Army Air Corps base in 1943.
  • Pueblo Memorial Airport
  • Pueblo Historical Aircraft Society
  • Pueblo Weisbrod Aircraft Museum 
External links

Trinidad, Colorado

The historic City of Trinidad is a Home Rule Municipality that is the county seat and the most populous city of Las Animas County, Colorado, United States.[6] The population was 9,096 as of the 2010 census, up slightly from 9,078 in 2000. The estimate as of 2012 was 8,771.

Demographics
As of the census of 2000, there were 9,078 people, 3,701 households, and 2,335 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,439.4 people per square mile. There were 4,126 housing units at an average density of 654.2 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 79.97% White, 0.54% African American, 3.02% Native American, 0.43% Asian, 0.14% Pacific Islander, 12.12% from other races, and 3.78% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 48.07% of the population.

There were 3,701 households out of which 29.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.6% were married couples living together, 14.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.9% were non-families. 32.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the city the population was spread out with 24.9% under the age of 18, 9.4% from 18 to 24, 24.2% from 25 to 44, 22.6% from 45 to 64, and 18.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 92.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $36,681, and the median income for a family was $33,992. Males had a median income of $27,817 versus $19,064 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,271. About 16.2% of families and 18.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.6% of those under age 18 and 20.0% of those age 65 or over.

Economy
For many years Trinidad housed the miners who worked in the coal mines of the Raton Basin south and west of the town. The coal mines are now closed, but since the 1980s companies have been drilling new gas wells to extract coalbed methane from the remaining coal seams.

Trinidad's location at the foot of Raton Pass, along the Santa Fe Trail between St. Joseph, Missouri and Santa Fe, New Mexico, has always made it a favored route for travellers, first by foot, then horse and ox-drawn wagon, then by railroad. Today Interstate 25, the most highly traveled route between Colorado and New Mexico, passes through Trinidad

External links

Woodland Park, Colorado

The City of Woodland Park is a Home Rule Municipality that is the most populous city in Teller County, Colorado, United States and is immediately west of El Paso County and the unincorporated community of Crystola. Many residents in this bedroom community, which is surrounded by the one-million acre (4,000 km²) Pike National Forest, make the 17-mile (27 km) commute to Colorado Springs. Ute Pass lies 12 miles (19 km) to the west of Woodland Park on US 24. The population was 6,515 at the 2000 census. Nearby Douglas County is about a fifteen-minute drive from the city.

Called the "The City Above the Clouds," Woodland Park, at 8,465 feet (2,580 m) above sea level, often enjoys clear skies while weather in neighboring towns may be rainy or overcast. The city has pursued a policy of careful growth, and enjoys breathtaking views of Pikes Peak. Woodland Park offers easy access to hiking, climbing, and fishing. Because of the city's location, there is a natural limitation to population growth.
 
Demographics
As of the census of 2000, there were 6,515 people, 2,476 households, and 1,884 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,151.0 people per square mile. There were 2,642 housing units at an average density of 466.8 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 94.89% White, 0.52% African American, 0.72% Native American, 0.87% Asian, 0.81% from other races, and 2.18% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.45% of the population..

There were 2,476 households out of which 39.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.3% were married couples living together, 7.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.9% were non-families. 19.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.03.

In the city the population was spread out with 28.5% under the age of 18, 5.8% from 18 to 24, 32.9% from 25 to 44, 26.3% from 45 to 64, and 6.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 100.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $52,279, and the median income for a family was $59,583. Males had a median income of $36,157 versus $27,459 for females. The per capita income for the city was $22,780. About 1.8% of families and 3.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.9% of those under age 18 and 3.7% of those age 65 or over.

Education
Students are served by Woodland Park School District RE-2.
 
External links